Category Archives: British Columbia

IIO Lets off RCMP Officer who Shot 24-Year-Old Five Times

The Independent Investigations Office (IIO), the agency that investigates cases of police harm to civilians in British Columbia has decided not to recommend charges against an RCMP officer who shot a 24-year-old in Port Hardy on Vancouver Island on July 8, 2015. The IIO suggested that the man made threatening comments to people and carried a small knife. There is no explanation for the total of five shots fired into the youth by the officer. The killer cop did not provide a statement to the IIO.


Video Raises Questions About In-Custody Death of Dale Culver in Prince George

The man who died while in custody of Prince George RCMP has been identified publicly as Dale Culver, a 35-year-old father of three. Several RCMP officers took part in Culver’s arrest allegedly following a call about someone looking at vehicles. Culver was pepper prayed and newly released video shows that four officers pinned him to the ground afterwards.

It has not been independently confirmed that Culver, or anyone else was “casing vehicles.” Yet on this basis he was killed by police. A terrible price to pay for simply being suspected of possibly looking at cars.

Seeing the video, Alicia Wisla, Culver’s partner and mother of their five-month-old child, insists the officers involved must be charged.

The available video footage can be viewed here:  http://globalnews.ca/news/3616428/girlfriend-of-prince-george-man-who-died-in-police-custody-wants-justice/?utm_source=980CKNW&utm_medium=Facebook


35-Year-Old Man Dies in Custody in Prince George (July 18, 2017)

The Independent Investigations Office (IIO), the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in British Columbia is investigating the death of a 35-year-old man in police custody in Prince George in northern BC. According to an IIO media release, Prince George RCMP arrested the victim on July 18 after responding to calls about a man allegedly looking at vehicles in a parking lot on the 1000 block of Central Street West at about 10:30 PM. Several police arrived on the scene. The person targeted by an officer was arrested after an alleged struggle with police in which the victim was pepper sprayed and put in the back of a police car. At some point it was noticed that the man appeared to be having trouble breathing and an ambulance was called. The victim supposedly collapsed when removed from the police car. He was pronounced dead at the hospital a bit after midnight. None of the released details have been independently confirmed. Neither has it been confirmed that the man arrested was the man about whom the initial call to police was made.


IIO Determines RCMP Killed Man the Force Claimed Killed Self

There has long been a concern, a suspicion, that police claim victims of police shootings have died of self-inflicted wounds when, in fact, they were killed by officers. (That suspicion has been particularly strong in cases where police investigate police.) One such case was confirmed on Monday, June 26, 2017 when the Internal Investigations Office (IIO) in British Columbia, the oversight agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians overturned an RCMP claim that the June 18, 2017, death of a Lower Mainland man had died of a self-inflicted wound despite police firing shots at the man. The IIO has determined that the man killed in Port Coquitlam, in fact, died from a police bullet.

In a media release on Juen 26, IIO spokesperson Marten Youssef declared: “Initial reports made to the IIO … by the RCMP, suggested that a distraught male may have shot himself following an exchange of gunfire with police. Following an autopsy, it has been determined that the male’s death was not self-inflicted.” In the initial, confused, report from the RCMP the force had made it seem publicly that the man had killed himself. That was the impression they shaped for the public.

The IIO  reported that it had interviewed six police officers and 30 witnesses over the past week. They have additionally reported that in the hours after the police killing a male relative of the man killed also received “serious injuries.” That situation is still being investigated. No police officers were injured.

While recognizing the numerous problems with the IIO, one can speculate how the initial RCMP claims might have been treated had another police force investigated the present case. RCMP distorting facts for public management after killing someone is not unique in the province as the killing of Robert Dziekanski showed.


IIO Investigates after Man Dies During Police Encounter, Shots Fired

The Independent Investigations Office (IIO), the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in British Columbia, is investigating the death of a man during an encounter with police in which shots were fired by police. Publicly available details are sketchy at the moment but it is suggested by the IIO that RCMP responded to a report of a distraught man threatening to harm himself outside a home in Port Coquitlam, Metro Vancouver, Sunday June 18, 2017. The IIO statement is unclear and suggests only that the man fired shots  into the air, yet there is an investigation into whether his injuries were self-inflicted. Police are said to have fired weapons during the encounter and the victim was found dead after RCMP fired.


IIO Investigates as Victoria Woman Dies Only Hours After Interaction with Police

The Independent Investigations Office (IIO), the oversight body that examines cases of police harm to civilians in British Columbia, is investigating after a woman was found dead in the Victoria suburb of Oak Bay around 9: 30 on the morning of Saturday, May 27, 2017. Police officers had some interaction with the woman Friday evening, hours before she was found dead but neither Victoria police nor the IIO are providing any more information to the public. This lends a curious air of mystery to the situation. The BC Coroners Service is also investigating. The victim has not been named.


Bogus “Suicide By Cop” Used to Excuse Constable Musicco in Killing Rhett Mutch but No Reasons Given for Inquest Finding

This project has documented the bogus nature of “suicide by cop” as a means to excuse police killings of civilians. It is a form of copaganda used as a legitimation tool by so-called oversight agencies (none of which are autonomous and independent from police with powers of compulsion) and state inquests to justify police killings of civilians to an anxious and critical public. The reasons for the bogus nature of this claim are numerous and have been laid out here previously. The claim is only applied after the fact in diverse situations and ignores the fact that unlike in other suicides the victim is killed, not by their own actions, but by the conscious decision of someone who chooses to use lethal force rather choosing not to kill.

Once again this phony “finding” has been used to legitimate the lethal actions of a killer cop. The killing of 20-year-old Victoria youth Rhett Mutch by police constable John Musicco has been declared a suicide by a coroner’s inquest in findings announced May 19, 2017. Incredibly the inquest report offered no reasons for why the jury classified the killing as a suicide. Constable Musicco had already been cleared by the Independent Investigations Office (IIO), the body that examines cases of police violence against civilians in British Columbia.

Musicco shot Mutch in the neck killing him  on November 1, 2014. At the time he was shot the young man was alone in the basement of his mother’s house and posed no threat to his mother (who was safely outside the house) or to the general public.

The report even noted in detail an exchange between Marney Mutch, the victim’s mother, and police officers in which she told them that her son would not hurt anyone. She also informed them that drawn guns would only frighten her distraught son further. She told the inquest that one of the officers held a gun that looked like “a bazooka.” This is another problem of “suicide by cop” excuses. They ignore the role of police actions in changing victim’s interactions. In her view, as stated in the report: “This is really overkill.” She wanted to stay in the house with her son but officers refused her request.