Category Archives: Quebec

Trial Begins for Killer Cop Simon Beaulieu in Guy Blouin Killing

Québec City police officer Simon Beaulieu killed 48-year-old Guy Blouin on September 3, 2014, striking the victim with his vehicle. Guy Blouin died in hospital from the fatal chest injuries inflicted by Beaulieu.

On October 13, 2017 the first witness testified in Beaulieu’s trial with the officer facing charges of criminal negligence causing death and dangerous driving causing death. Yves Brière, a crime scene reconstruction expert with the Sûreté du Québec, the provincial police force, testified that Beaulieu’s police cruiser hit and killed Guy Blouin while backing up on a one-way street at 44 kilometers an hour.

Brière showed Québec Court Judge René de la Sablonnière photos of the police cruiser, and explained that Blouin and the bicycle slid under the car, at the corner of Saint-François Est and du Parvis streets, in the Saint-Roch neighborhood. Blouin was run over with the right rear wheel of the cruiser. Brière testified that by the time the police car driven by Beaulieu had stopped, Blouin’s body was lying seven meters away. The police car’s bumper showed several rubber marks where the bicycle slid under the car, according to Brière.

Incredibly officer Beaulieu was promoted from constable to sergeant-detective after driving over and killing Guy Boulin. And people wonder why the public might be skeptical about prospects for police accountability within a system that depends on and rewards killer cops. Killer cop Beaulieu has been on desk duty pending his trial.

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Surete du Quebec Shoot and Kill 23-Year-Old Man in La Sarre (Aug. 20, 2017)

The Independent Investigations Bureau (BEI), the unit that examines police harm to civilians in Quebec, is investigating the killing of a 23-year-old man by Surete du Quebec officers in La Sarre, a town in northwestern Quebec on August 20, 2017.

According to the BEI, two Surete du Quebec officers in vehicle patrol attempted to intercept a vehicle around 6 PM.  A police pursuit ended with the two vehicles colliding. Following the collision the victim excited his vehicle and was quickly shot by police. He died as a result of those police-inflicted wounds. Police have reported the man held a knife but none of the police accounts have been independently confirmed.

The BEI has assigned eight investigators to the case. The BEI is not an independent unit and will be assisted by a forensic identification technician and a reconstructionist from the Montreal police.


BEI Investigating Police Killing of Distressed Man Near Quebec City (August 10, 2017)

Québec’s Independent Investigations Bureau (BEI), the unit that examines police harm to civilians in the province, is investigating the killing of a 25-year old man by an officer of the Sûreté du Québec (SQ) around 7 PM on August 10, 2017 in Saint-Georges-de-Beauce, southeast of Québec City. According to the BEI, police responded to a call regarding a man experiencing some distress in the center of a street. The BEI states that the responding officer activated the flashing lights of the cruiser which caused the man to panic and run. After a foot chase that ended in a parking lot the officer shot the man. The SQ claim the man had a knife. None of the details have been independently confirmed. Eight BEI investigators have been assigned to the case and will examine the SQ version of events. The BEI is not an independent unit though and Montreal police will assist them in this investigation, which leaves police investigating police.


66-Year-Old Pedestrian Killed in Police Chase in Quebec (July 30, 2017)

A police chase in Pointe-Calumet, west of Île Bizard, Quebec, July 30, 2017, has left one pedestrian, a 66-year-old man, dead. Eight investigators of the province’s Bureau des enquêtes indépendantes (BEI, Bureau of Independent Investigations), the body that examines police harm to civilians in Quebec, are looking into the case. Police supposedly began pursuit of the car after it allegedly made “strange maneuvers.” The car later crashed into a Hydro-Quebec pole. The three occupants were arrested and taken to hospital with injuries.


Montreal Killer Cop Christian Gilbert Pleads Not Guilty: Killed Bony Jean-Pierre

Montreal police officer Christian Gilbert, who killed Bony Jean-Pierre (46) in April 2016, has pleaded not guilty to the manslaughter charge against him. Gilbert shot Jean-Pierre in the head with a plastic bullet during a raid. The killing of Jean-Pierre sparked an uprising in the Montreal North Neighborhood where the shooting happened. The charge against officer Gilbert represents only the ninth time since 1999 that an officer has been charged in the injuring or killing of a civilian in Quebec.

Gilbert was not present in court for the July 6, 2017 appearance.  His defence lawyer Isabelle Briand also informed the court that Gilbert wants a trial by judge and jury. Gilbert’s next court date is scheduled for August 29, 2017.


Racism, Poverty, Mental Health, and the Montreal Police Killing of Pierre Coriolan

An intersection of racism, poverty, mental health distress, and police violence has once again had a  deadly outcome. The 58-year-old man shot multiple times and killed by Montreal police has been identified as Pierre Coriolan, a Black male of Haitian background who was know to suffer mental health issues. It has now been further revealed that Coriolan was facing eviction from the apartment he had been living in since 2008 on July 1, 2017, and that this had understandably greatly distressed him. The eviction order was issued against Mr. Coriolan by the Quebec rental board on June 1 according to Claudine Laurin, director general of la Fédération des OSBL d’habitation de Montréal, an organization of subsidized housing apartments. That a subsidized housing association would evict someone over mental health issues is troubling.

Police were supposedly responding to a call that Mr. Coriolan was breaking things in his apartment when they showed up and shot him. It has not been stated publicly why police chose to shoot someone multiple times for smashing his apartment but the earlier mentioned intersectional factors offer something of an answer, particularly the engrained violence of police. When Urgence-Santé arrived at the scene of the shooting around 7:30 PM, Mr. Coriolan was in cardiac arrest. He was taken to hospital and died at about 9:45 PM.

Neighbors have said that they sometimes heard Mr. Coriolan screaming and plates breaking in the apartment but insist that he did not bother them and they understood that he was not well. They did not fear him and were not disturbed by him. Neighbors expressed shock over the police actions.


Montreal Police Kill Another Black Man (June 27, 2017)

The Montreal police have a terrible history of killing Black civilians. The names of some of the victims, such as Presley Leslie, Marcellus Francois, and Alain Magloire, give testimony to that fact. That is only part of the story as Black residents regularly speak out against racial profiling and violence directed against them by Montreal police. It is important to note, then, that the 58-year-old man shot multiple times and killed by Montreal police on June 27, 2017, has been identified as a Black man by the BEI (Bureau des enquêtes indépendantes, Bureau of Independent Investigations), the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in Quebec. The victim has not yet been named.

The killing again raises many questions about the Montreal police force (though racism and regular deployment of lethal force are standards of police forces across Canada at municipal, provincial, and federal levels). As Fo Niemi, the executive director of Montreal’s Centre for Research Action on Race Relations, suggests: “It raises the question, ‘where do we go from here?’ Is this a case where race plays a role in this incident? Is it mental health? I think there are a lot of questions here that need to be asked because this is not a situation that should occur too often in this city” (quoted in CBC News 2017).

Before being shot the man had only been suggested to be breaking things in his apartment. Surely not a capital, or even particularly harmful “offense.” As community activist Will Prosper, a former RCMP officer, puts it the man appears not have been “presenting a menace to anyone except to his apartment” (quoted in CBC News 2017). Yet police moved to coercive, then lethal means. Questions must be asked about the role of racism, or implicit bias, in this.

Critics note that police use of threatening behavior and the display of weapons will only make the situation worse in a case of someone experiencing mental distress or already feeling anxious and defensive. As Prosper suggests: “That’s not what you need to preserve the life of the citizen. It’s going to do the [complete opposite], and I think that’s probably what happened in this case” (quoted in CBC News 2017). In Prosper’s view, the man could have benefited from someone talking to and calming him down without the presence of weapons. In Prosper’s words: “If you’re saying ‘calm down’ and you have the gun pointed at his face, that’s not going to work” (quoted in CBC News 2017). This is why police should not be sent in such cases in place of health care providers (if anyone needs to be sent for smashing dishes at home at all).

Police racism and the killings of Black men have received too little public attention and ire. These realities have been ideologically downplayed by governments at all levels. They have also been distorted and denied by police officers, forces, and associations. Criminologists in Canada have also done too little to expose and challenge these issues, too often playing the part of police apologists. Black Lives Matter activists and movements have done much work to shift understandings in the Canadian context.

 

Further Reading

CBC News. 2017. “’Where do We Go from Here?’ Fatal Shooting by Montreal Police Raises Hard Questions.” CBC News. June 28. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/montreal-police-shooting-mental-illness-1.4181469