Category Archives: Quebec

Quebec Killer Cop François Laurin Sentenced to One Year for Killing Éric Rompré

François Laurin, an officer of the provincial Sûreté du Québec, has been sentenced to one year in jail for dangerous driving causing death, eight months to be served concurrently for dangerous driving causing bodily harm, and two years of probation in the vehicular killing of Éric Rompré and injuring of Marie-Ève Bossé in June 2012. Laurin had been found guilty of these offenses in January 2017. As part of his sentence, Laurin will also have to serve 150 hours of community service. He is prohibited from driving for 30 months.

Officer Laurin collided with a car carrying Éric Rompré and his partner Marie-Ève Bossé while racing to support a fellow officer at the Montebello Rockfest. He was traveling at 180 km/hr at the time. Rompré (25) died as a result of the crash, while Bossé is still suffering from the serious injuries that she sustained, including head trauma.

The Crown prosecutor had called for a two-year sentence for dangerous driving causing death, 16 months to be served concurrently for dangerous driving causing bodily harm, and a four-year driving ban. Laurin, a 28-year veteran of the force has been suspended without pay by the Sûreté du Québec.

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Investigation into Death of David Tshiteya Kalubi (23) in Custody of Montreal Police (Black Lives Matter)

Quebec’s Independent Investigations Bureau (BEI), the unit that examines police harm to civilians in the province, is investigating the in custody death of David Tshiteya Kalubi, a 23-year-old Black youth. Kalubi, who was arrested by Montreal police in his own neighborhood of Hochelaga, was declared dead less that 12 hours after his arrest.

Little information has been released publicly. Police say Kalubi was stopped by officers in Hochelaga and arrested on an outstanding warrant after police ran a background check. The BEI has not stated publicly what the outstanding warrant was for, only that it involved a municipal offense.

Community activists in the city, which has seen many cases of lethal police violence against civilians, and disproportionately against Black people, are raising concerns about Kalubi’s death and the actions of police. Racial profiling and so-called carding, where people are stopped by police and subjected to interrogation and/or background checks, have been strongly condemned by community members in cities across Canada. Carding goes hand in hand with profiling as Black people are disproportionately stopped for carding checks in Canadian contexts. Kalubi is of Congolese background.

Montreal police reportedly took Kalubi to the station, where he spent the night before being transferred to the municipal courthouse in Old Montreal to appear before a judge, according to the BEI. The transfer took place at 7:35 AM. Only a little more than an hour later, at 8:55 AM, a guard noticed that Kalubi was on the floor and appeared to be unconscious. He was then taken to the hospital and declared dead at 9:55 AM. Community members are raising concerns that Kalubi was subjected to differential, discriminatory, treatment because of histories of police racism in Montreal. The family, for its part has not raised the issues of racial profiling. According to the family’s lawyer, Virginie Dufresne-Lemire: “For the moment, there’s not enough information to know if it’s a case of racial profiling, but with a young black man arrested it can look like racial profiling” (quoted in MacArthur 2017).

Dan Philip, the executive director of the Black Coalition of Quebec has said publicly that it took police seven hours to notify his mother and family of Kalubi’s death. Even then, police took the opportunity to  first interrogated the family about Kalubi, before telling them he was dead, according to Philip. Said Philip, in an interview with CBC News: “They felt it was a travesty. They felt there was no compassion. They felt that there was no concern about either the death of the young man or the family themselves who have to mourn the situation” (quoted in MacArthur 2017).

Community advocates have little confidence that the BEI will provide satisfactory answers to the family’s many questions. Critics have long pointed out that the BEI includes several former police officers among its active members.  As Philips suggests: “It’s the police investigating the police. They have no interest in finding out why did he died and what negligence caused his death” (quoted in MacArthur 2017). It has also been pointed out repeatedly that the BEI lacks any meaningful diversity. It is expected that their report will not be released for another year yet.

 

Further Reading

MacArthur, Cecilia. 2017. “After a Young Man Dies in Custody, a Family Searches for Answers.” CBC News. November 24 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/david-tshiteya-kalubi-montreal-police-1.4416153


Killer SQ Cop Patrick Ouellet’s Charge For Killing 5-Year-Old Nicholas Thorne-Belance Will Not Be Dropped

Killer Quebec cop Patrick Ouellet, a member of the provincial force the Sûreté du Québec (SQ), will not have the charge dropped for killing  five-year-old Nicholas Thorne-Belance in 2014, a Quebec judge has decided. Ouellet had filed a motion seeking to have the charge of dangerous driving causing death dropped and has alleged interference in the case by Quebec Justice Minister Stéphanie Vallée.

Ouellet was involved in a police surveillance operation in which he was tailing the director of the Quebec Liberal Party in an unmarked car on February 13, 2014. During this operation officer Ouellet crashed into a car in which Thorne-Belance was a passenger in Longueuil, south of Montreal. Oullet’s care was traveling at a speed in excess of 120 kilometers per hour in a 50 km/hr zone. The young Thorne-Belance died in a hospital a few days after the crash.

The Crown prosecutor had initially decided not to lay charges, the usual result in cases of police killing civilians, even children, in Canada. A single charge was filed against Ouellet in 2015 after Vallée ordered an independent review of the case amid strong public pressure. Quebec Court Judge Denys Noel ruled on November 21, 2017, that there was no interference on Vallée’s part. Concluded Judge Noel: “One cannot infer from the evidence that the minister ordered the director (to file the charge). There is no evidence of abuse of procedure that would allow for the proceedings to be dropped.” Killer cop  Patrick Ouellet’s trial is scheduled to begin in June, 2018.


23-Year-Old Dies in Police Custody at Montreal Courthouse (Nov. 8, 2017)

A 23-year old man has died in police custody after being transferred to the Montreal municipal courthouse. The Independent Investigations Bureau (BEI), the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in Quebec, has assigned a team of 15 investigators to examine the circumstances of the death. According to the BEI, initial reports suggest the victim was arrested by Montreal police at 10:40 PM on the evening of Tuesday, November 7, 2017. On Wednesday, November 8, at around 7:30 AM he was transferred to the Montreal municipal courthouse where he was set to await his court appearance later that day. BEI claims that at around 8:55 AM officers assigned to watch the prisoners became aware that the victim was on the ground and apparently unconscious. He was transported to hospital where he was pronounced dead only one hour later. Details of this case have not been independently confirmed publicly.


Trial for Killer Cop Simon Beaulieu Hears Cops Should Be Given More Consideration Than “Regular” Citizens

Quebec City police officer Simon Beaulieu drove into and killed Guy Blouin  on September 30, 2014, backing his police vehicle over the victim who was riding a bicycle at the time. We have already documented the base policing assumptions that led Beaulieu to act in the way that he did in killing Blouin (assuming Blouin was suspicious because he was riding the wrong way on a one way street; assuming he had something to hide because he did not obey an order allegedly given to stop, etc.).

On Monday, October 23, 2017, the court heard, during Beaulieu’s trial on charges of criminal negligence and dangerous driving causing death, that as a police officer he “could not be judged on the same level as a regular citizen” (Page 2017). Said Beaulieu’s defense attorney Maxime Roy: “We can imagine that being on patrol requires more manoeuvres than your average person” (quoted in Page 2017). And Roy concluded that Beaulieu was simply “trying to do his job and apprehend a suspect” (Page 2017). Never mind that the so-called suspect was a product of the officer’s authoritarian privilege and did nothing more than ride the wrong way and, the clincher, disobey a police order (which there is no way of knowing was either given or heard).

It is no surprise that police believe they are better than “regular” members of society and should be treated preferentially in all cases. This is a rather common approach to getting killer cops off in the rare cases in which they are actually brought to trial. That it could be confidently uttered as an element of defense in a killing of a civilian who did no wrong shows the nature of the criminal justice system in the Canadian state context.

 

Further Reading

Page, Julia. 2017. “Defence Attorney Calls for Acquittal on all Charges Against Quebec City Police Officer.” CBC News. October 23. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/simon-beaulieu-defence-closing-arguments-1.4367741


Killer Cop Simon Beaulieu and the Policing Assumptions that Take Lives

Quebec City police officer Simon Beaulieu killed 48-year-old  Guy Blouin when he struck the cyclist with his police vehicle on Sept. 3, 2014. During Beaulieu’s ongoing trial for criminal negligence and dangerous driving causing death, Yves Brière, a crime scene reconstruction expert with the Sûreté du Québec (the provincial force), earlier testified that he estimated Beaulieu to be traveling in reverse at 44 km/h when the cruiser hit and drove over Blouin on his bicycle.

On October18, 2017, officer Beaulieu took the stand. His testimony was interesting in revealing several generally held police assumptions about people that contribute to the killing of civilians by police.

First, cops assume everyone is a criminal (except themselves). Beaulieu testified that he was on a routine patrol in the Saint-Roch neighborhood when he observed Guy Blouin cycling toward him. But Blouin was riding his bike on a one-way street in the wrong direction. So Beaulieu assumed something was up and maneuvered his police car to block the cyclist.

Second, cops assume that everyone respects their authority unquestioningly, so anyone who does not listen to an officer’s orders must be up to something or hiding something. So, when Blouin rode his bike around the car and appeared to ignore the police order to stop, Beaulieu immediately suspected the cyclist had been involved in criminal activity. Not that he did not hear the order or had no reason to be stooped by police. In Beaulieu’s own words: ”In my experience, someone who doesn’t stop has something to hide” (quoted in Page 2017). So Beaulieu backed the police car into and over Blouin.

Third, cops assume that victims will be grateful for help offered initially from the very officers who hurt them. Beaulieu heard Blouin scream in agony from being driven over and excited his police car and saw the stricken man on the ground with leg and shoulder injuries. According to Beaulieu, the victim was agitated and refusing help from the officers. Did they call for medical help right away?

Fourth, and incredibly, cops assume that telling someone they are under arrest will calm them down!?! In Beaulieu’s words: “He was not collaborating, so I tried telling him he was under arrest to get him to calm down,” (quoted in Page 2017).

Fifth, cops assume that traveling in an ambulance with someone they have injured only moments before will make the victim less agitated. In this case both officers went with Blouin to hospital because , in their view, he was visibly agitated. And why wouldn’t he be?

In this case, Blouin remained agitated as the officers accompanied him . He lost consciousness en route and died only 20 minutes after being driven over by officer Beaulieu.

It turns out that the bike Blouin was riding at the time, which Beaulieu assumed was stolen because the rider was going the wrong way on a one way street and did not stop when an officer ordered him to, had been purchased by Guy Blouin at a local pawn shop. Police assumptions kill. An do so with frequency in the Canadian state context.

 

Further Reading

Page, Julia. 2017. “Quebec City Police Officer Accused of Running Over Cyclist Says Speed Wasn’t Over 25 km/h.” CBC News October 18. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/simon-beaulieu-testimony-guy-blouin-death-1.4360387

 


Trial Begins for Killer Cop Simon Beaulieu in Guy Blouin Killing

Québec City police officer Simon Beaulieu killed 48-year-old Guy Blouin on September 3, 2014, striking the victim with his vehicle. Guy Blouin died in hospital from the fatal chest injuries inflicted by Beaulieu.

On October 13, 2017 the first witness testified in Beaulieu’s trial with the officer facing charges of criminal negligence causing death and dangerous driving causing death. Yves Brière, a crime scene reconstruction expert with the Sûreté du Québec, the provincial police force, testified that Beaulieu’s police cruiser hit and killed Guy Blouin while backing up on a one-way street at 44 kilometers an hour.

Brière showed Québec Court Judge René de la Sablonnière photos of the police cruiser, and explained that Blouin and the bicycle slid under the car, at the corner of Saint-François Est and du Parvis streets, in the Saint-Roch neighborhood. Blouin was run over with the right rear wheel of the cruiser. Brière testified that by the time the police car driven by Beaulieu had stopped, Blouin’s body was lying seven meters away. The police car’s bumper showed several rubber marks where the bicycle slid under the car, according to Brière.

Incredibly officer Beaulieu was promoted from constable to sergeant-detective after driving over and killing Guy Boulin. And people wonder why the public might be skeptical about prospects for police accountability within a system that depends on and rewards killer cops. Killer cop Beaulieu has been on desk duty pending his trial.