Category Archives: Saskatchewan

19-Year-Old Man Dies In Custody of Onion Lake, Saskatchewan, RCMP (Oct. 12, 2019)

A 19-year-old man died on the morning of October 12, 2019, while in-custody at the RCMP Detachment in Onion Lake. Saskatchewan. RCMP have only reported that the youth’s death was “sudden.” In their media, the RCMP say the man, from Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, was found unresponsive in the cell area shortly after 8 AM. Paramedics were apparently called, and the man was pronounced dead on the scene.

There is no outside unit in Saskatchewan to investigate police-involved deaths in the province so police in Saskatchewan investigate police. In this case Moose Jaw Police are investigating the circumstances of the death. The Ministry of Justice is expected to appoint an observer during the investigation. In any event, this is an unacceptable process of one force “investigating” another force, a process that lacks credibility.


Lucien Silverquill (37) Identified as Saulteaux Man Killed by RCMP at Fishing Lake First Nation

Lucien Silverquill has been identified publicly by his brother Moses Silverquill as the 37-year-old Saulteaux man shot and killed by Saskatchewan RCMP. The victim was a father with young children. The scene he describes, and the RCMP handling of it, raises some serious questions about police conduct.

Moses Silverquill suggests that the RCMP, as is often the case when they kill someone, were more concerned with an arrest than with ensuring the victim received necessary medical attention. He reports that Lucien Silverquill was shot twice, once in the chest and once in the leg. He says his brother was alive for some time but in great pain.

According to Moses Siverquill, RCMP officers attempted to handcuff and subdue his brother after they had shot him. In his view more than half an hour passed before Lucien Silverquill was put into the ambulance that had arrived on the scene (Pasiuk 2019). In his words: “It was a very horrific scene when we got there….They didn’t give him CPR or anything like that. They just pinned him to the ground. That’s what we saw” (quoted in Pasiuk 2019).

Moses Silverquill also points out the lack of information and response to questions by RCMP. He says that RCMP refused to let family members near his injured brother. According to Moses Silverquill: “It was very hard to get answers from [RCMP] as to what was going on with my brother” (quoted in Pasiuk 2019).

He has many questions about police actions before, during, and after the shooting. He wonders why alternative approaches were not taken and why police acted so quickly to shoot and were so single minded in privileging arrest over medical care, which his brother clearly needed. He asks: “I know the police officer that did the shooting must be really emotionally disturbed but was it dealt with properly? That’s the question…. Could this guy’s life have been saved?” (quoted in Pasiuk 2019).

Moses Silverquill reflects on the brother taken from his family by police violence: “My brother was a good person…. He had kids. He left little kids. I know he was a caring guy when he was with his family” (quoted in Pasiuk 2019).

 

Further Reading

Pasiuk, Emily. 2019. “Family Identifies Lucien Silverquill as Man Killed by RCMP on Fishing Lake First Nation.” CBC News August 28. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/lucien-silverquill-fishing-lake-first-nation-rcmp-shooting-1.5262506


Saskatchewan RCMP Shoot and Kill Man at Fishing Lake First Nation (Aug. 27, 2019)

Saskatchewan RCMP have shot and killed a man at a home on Fishing Lake First Nation, on the afternoon of August 27, 2019. The only report made publicly so far has been made by the RCMP. It has not been confirmed. The RCMP claim that officers from the Wadena detachment were dispatched at around 1:30 PM after receiving a call about a man, allegedly armed with a knife, causing a disturbance outside of a home. Shortly after encountering a man at least one officer discharged their firearm, striking him. The man was declared dead at the scene.

There is no police oversight body in Saskatchewan. RCMP have asked the Moose Jaw Police Service to conduct a police investigation into the killing. They have also asked the Saskatchewan Ministry of Justice to appoint an independent observer to asses the quality of the external investigation. The latter request is in accordance with the RCMP Act. This means that there will be no, even nominally, independent investigation into this killing.

The victim’s next of kin have reportedly been notified of his death but the name is not being released publicly.


Indigenous Father Geoff Morris (41) Killed by Regina Police (May 4, 2019).

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) is calling for an independent investigation after the killing of Geoff Morris (41) by Regina Police Service officers on May 4, 2019. In a news release, FSIN Vice Chief Dutch Lerat noted that,

“We have seen officers investigating their fellow officers and we all know how those investigations turn out. We are calling on the Regina Police Service to allow for an outside and independent oversight body to be a part of this investigation. We have been calling for this for years and these senseless police-related deaths keep happening.”

Morris was shot and killed by Regina police, during what cops say was a hostage situation. There are reasons to be skeptical about this given the lack of public information around another recent alleged hostage-taking in which two people were killed by RCMP in Surrey, British Columbia in March 2019. In that case it was later revealed that police had shot and killed both people, including the alleged hostage Nona McEwan. Notably, Regina Police chief Evan Bray would not say whether an alleged hostage was still being held when the shooting occurred.

Indeed, the police justification of events is being contradicted by Morris’ fiancé, Jasmine Brass, who says she was present when Morris was killed. In her words: “Honestly it wasn’t necessary for them to kill him, they could’ve just tased him” (quoted in Melnychuck 2019). She reports that Morris had been struggling with mental health issues and that she and her sister were with Morris trying to help him the morning he was killed by police.

Brass also reports that he became more agitated when police arrived, a not uncommon occurrence as the appearance of police typically heightens tensions and stress. She gives a chilling account, saying on facebook that she heard a “bang” and felt a splatter of blood at the moment of killing. Incredibly Brass reports that police shot Morris while she sat between his legs.

Morris was biological father to four children. He also took in six other children and raised them. One daughter, Tanisha Whiteman, remembers him as a good, loving man who struggled with anxiety issues. She asks why police acted so quickly to kill. In her words:

“That’s somebody’s father. That’s somebody’s son. That’s somebody’s brother, somebody’s nephew. He was loved by so many people. Why? Just like that, he’s gone. There could have been other ways that could have been handled. They didn’t have to take someone’s life away (quoted in Whitfield 2019a).

Heartbreaking words about the role played by police came from 12-year-old son Nakayoh Friday: “I want people to know that the people who were supposed to protect us aren’t protecting us. They are killing us. I don’t want other families to go through my pain” (quoted in Whitfield 2019b).

According to Regina Police chief Evan Bray, legislation requires that the Regina Police Service’s Major Crime unit investigates the shooting. Cops investigating cops. The officer involved in the shooting was a member of the patrol response remains on active duty.

Regina police claim that the killing of Morris is the first killing by an officer in the city since 1998. Police also claim that there have been four officer-involved shootings in the last 10 years, with none of those resulting in the death of the victim.

 

Further Reading

Melnychuck, Mark. 2019. “Fiancee of Man Shot by Regina Police Questions Why Officer Used Lethal Force.” Regina Leader-Post May 6. https://www.journalpioneer.com/news/canada/fiancee-of-man-shot-by-regina-police-questions-why-officer-used-lethal-force-308570/

Whitfield, Janani. 2019a. “’He Didn’t Deserve to Die Like That’: Man Killed by Regina Police Was a ‘Family Man.’” CBC News May 5. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/hostage-taking-incident-regina-geoff-morris-1.5124018

Whitfield, Janani. 2019b. “Children of Man Shot Dead by Regina Police Say He Was Close to Turning Life Around.” CBC News May 7. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/regina-shooting-police-death-1.5126084


Saskatoon Police Shoot and Kill 27-Year-Old Man (December 22, 2018)

Saskatoon Police Service officers have shot and killed a 27-year-old man on the evening of December 22, 2018. Few details have been released publicly but it has been reported that police responded to reports of a man in crisis in a motor vehicle. RCMP officers were reportedly the first to encounter the man, partially disabling his vehicle with a tire-deflation device. Saskatoon Police Service officers then encountered the man, shooting him. The victim died in hospital.

It has been reported that the man was in contact by phone with several people, including Saskatoon police crisis negotiators, throughout the evening, including during the killing.


Pressing Questions as Inquest into Police-Involved Death of Indigenous Man Jordan Lafond is Postponed to June

There are many unanswered questions about the role Saskatoon police played in the death of 21-year-old Jordan Lafond of the Muskeg Lake Cree Nation. An inquest into the death that was scheduled to take begin March 5, 2018, and which family hoped would provide some answers, has now been postponed until June 25.

The questions surrounding Lafond’s death are more pressing given that police initially suggested the injuries that led to Lafond’s death were inflicted in a vehicular crash and did not report that an officer used his knee to subdue the young man when he was handcuffed.

It has been reported publicly that Jordan Lafond died after the stolen truck he was a passenger in crashed into a fence on the outskirts of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in the early morning hours of October 23, 2016. Lafond was taken into custody and later died in hospital. Police have not been forthcoming on their role in Lafond’s death and what they did to him during the arrest.

A six-person jury, five women and one-man, was selected on Monday. Four of the jurors are Indigenous. Three were selected from a special jury pool of Indigenous people and one who self-identified. The request for Indigenous jurors can be made at inquests but not for criminal trials, an issue that has received great attention following the recent not guilty verdicts in the killings of Indigenous youth Colten Boushie and Tina Fontaine. The inquest is strictly a fact finding exercise and cannot assign blame or lead to charges being laid.

Grace Lafond-Barr, Jordan’s grandmother expressed the family’s grief: “Emotions have been up and down. A lot of tears, a lot of anger, a lot of sadness. Because we don’t know what happened to Jordan” (quoted in Hamilton 2018). She noted that police were not honest in reporting their actions during Jordan Lafond’s arrest. In her words: “We didn’t hear the truth when we were told of Jordan’s injuries. It would be nice to know what happened to him” (quoted in Hamilton 2018).

Police changed their story about what happened a few weeks after Lafond died. They had initially claimed that Lafond was found underneath a tire of the truck that crashed and said at that time that he died of injuries resulting from that crash. Then-police Chief Clive Weighill alleged that officers believed Lafond was resisting arrest and acknowledged that an officer used his knee to subdue Lafond and that he was handcuffed. Police have not admitted what part that might have played in the death.

Police even had to downgrade the initial charge of dangerous driving causing death laid against the driver of the stolen truck. Said the Crown prosecutor at the time: “We weren’t in a position to prove that the accident—or the collision, in this case—caused the death” (quoted in Hamilton 2018).

Saskatoon Police Service released a statement on March 5 saying that  they had carried out an internal investigation into Lafond’s death but would not release any details or results. There is no police oversight body, independent or otherwise, in Saskatchewan. The officer responsible is still on regular duties.

Jordan Lafond was a new father and worked at a roofing company to support her. Said Lafond-Barr: “Yes maybe he was in a stolen vehicle. But that doesn’t mean you should end his life over it. That’s what I said. I would like to bring some humanity to this (quoted in Hamilton 2018).

Anyone following events in Saskatchewan will note that young Indigenous men have been killed in that province for as little as stepping foot on a farm claimed by a white settler, with the settler farmer getting off despite admitting to the killing. So being killed by police for being in a stolen vehicle would not be unlikely in that context. And the officer involved will likely not even be charged. Jordan Lafond was the same age as Colten Boushie.

 

Further Reading

Hamilton, Charles. 2018. “’Everyone is Disappointed’: Inquest into Death of Jordan Lafond Postponed Until June.” CBC News March 5. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/family-hoping-for-answers-as-inquest-in-jordan-lafond-s-death-begins-1.4559159

 


Thirty-Four-Year-Old Man Dies Following Encounter with Regina Police Services (Jan. 16, 2018)

A 34-year-old man has died following a period in care of the Regina Police Service in the morning of January 16, 2018. According Regina police, officers were dispatched to a residence in a south Regina neighborhood, on Pasqua Street, at around 6:30 AM. Police say they arrived on the scene and found the man in distress. He was transported to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

There is no oversight body to investigate police harm to civilians in Saskatchewan. Police and the Office of the Chief Coroner will jointly investigate the death. The Regina Police Service has requested that the Ministry of Justice appoint an independent observer to provide oversight and review the investigation. None of the claims made by police have been independently verified publicly. Results of any investigation will remain questionable because of a lack of real, meaningful independence from police.


Police-Involved Deaths in Canada in 2017: What Little We Know

There is no formal, systematic process for documenting and recording the deaths of civilians through encounters with police in Canada. There is no systematic reporting publicly of civilian deaths through police encounters. A baseline or minimum number of people who died through police encounters can be arrived at by review of oversight agency reports, coroners inquest reports, and close following of media articles. Here is some of the very limited information of what we know about 65 reported deaths. Much more needs to be known and should be made public.

 

  1. Amleset Haile. Female. 60. January 2. Toronto, Ontario. Toronto Police Service. Self-inflicted. (Black woman).
  2. Jimmy Cloutier. Male. 38. January 6. Montreal, Quebec. Montreal Police. Shot.
  3. Ralph Stevens. Male. 27. January 7. Stoney Nakoda First Nation, Alberta. RCMP. Shot. (Indigenous man).
  4. Nadia Racine. Female. 34. January 25. Gatineau, Quebec. Gatineau Police. In-custody.
  5. Male. 20. February 11. Goodfare, Alberta. RCMP. In-custody.
  6. Male. No Age Given. February 12. Winnipeg, Manitoba. Winnipeg Police Service. In-custody.
  7. Moses Amik Beaver. Male. 56. February 13. Thunder Bay, Ontario. Thunder Bay Police. In-custody. (Indigenous Man).
  8. Female. 20. March 6. Burlington, Ontario. Halton Regional Police Service.
  9. Male. 28. March 6. Montreal, Quebec. Montreal Police. Heart attack.
  10. Vitaly Savin. Male. 55. March 9. Edmonton, Alberta. Edmonton Police Service. Shot.
  11. Male. 20. March 18. Pond Inlet. Nunavut. RCMP. Shot.
  12. Male. March 24. 61. Chateauguay, Quebec. Sûreté du Québec.
  13. Male. 40. April 1. Kelowna, British Columbia. RCMP. In-custody.
  14. Male. 24. April 28. Puvirnituq, Quebec. Kativik Regional Police Force. In-custody.
  15. Male. 39. May 2. Hall Beach. Nunavut. RCMP. Shot.
  16. Male. 32. May 13. Fort McMurray, Alberta. RCMP. In-custody.
  17. Male. 41. May 15. Beauceville, Quebec. Sûreté du Québec. Shot.
  18. Male. 26. May 22. Cambridge, Ontario.
  19. Female. No Age Given. May 27. Oak Bay, British Columbia. Victoria Police.
  20. Male. 43. June 3. Smith Falls, Ontario. Ontario Provincial Police. Self-inflicted.
  21. Male. 31. June 3. Ottawa, Ontario. Ottawa Police Service. Shot.
  22. Male. No Age Given. June 18. Port Coquitlam, British Columbia. RCMP. Shot
  23. Austin Eaglechief. Male. 22. June 19. Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Saskatoon Police. Shot.
  24. Pierre Coriolan. Male. 58. June 27. Montreal, Quebec. Montreal Police. Shot. (Black man).
  25. Male. No Age Given. July 3. Edmonton, Alberta. Edmonton Police Service. Vehicle chase.
  26. Male. No Age Given. July 5. Blaine Lake, Saskatchewan. RCMP. Self-inflicted.
  27. Male. No Age Given. July 9. Quebec City, Quebec. Quebec City Police. Shot.
  28. Dale Culvner. Male. 35. July 18. Prince George, British Columbia. RCMP. In-custody.
  29. Marlon “Roland” Jerry McKay. Male. 50. July 19. Thunder Bay, Ontario. Thunder Bay Police. In-custody. (Indigenous man).
  30. Shawn Davis. Male. 52. July 26. Chatham, Ontario. Chatham Police. “Sudden Death.”
  31. Male. 66. July 30. Pointe-Calumet, Quebec. Vehicle chase.
  32. Male. 25. August 10. Saint-Georges-de-Beauce, Quebec. Sûreté du Québec. Shot.
  33. Female. 55. August 7. Edmonton, Alberta. Edmonton Police Service. In-custody.
  34. Male. 23. August 20. La Sarre, Quebec. Sûreté du Québec. Shot.
  35. Male. No Age Given. August 13. Winnipeg, Manitoba. In-custody.
  36. Ozama Shaw. Male. 15. July 27. Mississauga, Ontario. Peel Region Police. Shot. (Black youth).
  37. Male. 48. September 4. Sudbury, Ontario. Sudbury Police. In-custody.
  38. Female. 26. September 4. Windsor, Ontario. Windsor Police Service. In-custody.
  39. Unnamed Male. 26. September 6. Whitefish Lake First Nation, Alberta. RCMP. Shot.
  40. Female. 46. September 9. Indian Head, Saskatchewan. RCMP. In-custody.
  41. Male. 29. September 9. Edmonton, Alberta. Edmonton Police Service. Shot.
  42. Adrian Lacquette. 23. September 13. Winnipeg, Manitoba. Winnipeg Police Service. Shot.
  43. Male. 34. September 15. Windsor, Ontario. Windsor Police Service. In-custody.
  44. Male. 33. September 23. Winnipeg, Manitoba. Winnipeg Police Service. Shot.
  45. Sheila Walsh. Female. 65. September 25. Arnprior, Ontario. Ontario Provincial Police. Vehicle chase.
  46. Female. No Age Given. October 2. Quesnel, British Columbia. RCMP. In-custody.
  47. Nathan Wehlre. Male. 15. October 6. Highway 6, Ontario. Waterloo Regional Police. Vehicle chase.
  48. Taryn Hewitt. Female. 16. October 6. Highway 6, Ontario. Waterloo Regional Police. Vehicle chase.
  49. Cody Severight. Male. 23. October 10. Winnipeg, Manitoba. Winnipeg Police Service. Hit and run, officer DUI.
  50. Male. 35. October 12. Qualicum Beach, British Columbia. RCMP. Shot.
  51. Cavin Poucette. Male. 26. October 19. Gleichen, Alberta. RCMP. Shot. (Indigenous man).
  52. Brydon Bryce Whitstone. Male. 22. October 22. North Battleford, Saskatchewan. (Indigenous man).
  53. Tom Ryan. Male. 70. October 27. Cobourg, Ontario. Cobourg Police Service. Shot.
  54. Male. 44. October 31. Brampton, Ontario. Peel Regional Police. During arrest.
  55. Male. 23. November 8. Montreal, Quebec. Montreal Police. In-custody.
  56. Bill Saunders. Male. 18. November 15. Lake Manitoba First Nation, Manitoba. Shot.
  57. Male. 57. November 26. Toronto, Ontario. Toronto Police Service. In-custody.
  58. David Tshitoya Kalubi. Male. 23. November 24. Montreal, Quebec. Montreal Police. In-custody. (Black youth).
  59. Male. 52. December 6. Douglas, Ontario. Ontario Provincial Police. Shot.
  60. Male. 25. December 13. Maple, Ontario. Toronto Police Service. Shot.
  61. Babak Saidi. Male. 43. December 23. Morrisburg, Ontario. Ontario Provincial Police. Shot.
  62. Male. December 24. Edmonton, Alberta. Edmonton Police Service. In-custody.
  63. Male. 22. December 28. Umiujaq, Quebec. Shot.
  64. Male. 36. December 28. Danford Lake, Quebec. Sûreté du Québec. Shot
  65. Male. No Age Given. December 30. Mississauga, Ontario. Peel Regional Police. Shot.

 

 


Saskatchewan RCMP Shoot and Kill 22-Year-Old Indigenous Man, Brydon Bryce Whitstone (Oct. 21, 2017)

Saskatchewan RCMP shot and killed 22-year-old Brydon Bryce Whitstone of Onion Lake Cree Nation around 9 PM on the evening of Saturday, October 21, 2017, in North Battleford.

RCMP have reported that they received a call from a man, saying he had been chased and shot at from a vehicle.  Police located the suspected vehicle and gave pursuit until they immobilized the vehicle. During their interaction with the driver shots were fired injuring a man inside the vehicle.  The victim, now identified as Brydon Bryce Whitstone, was pronounced dead at around 9:40 PM, while en route to hospital.

RCMP also report that a woman inside the vehicle suffered minor injuries. She was taken to hospital, but then released into police custody. Neither her condition nor the specific reason she was taken into custody have been reported publicly at this time. Neither has it been reported publicly how many shots were fired by RCMP officers. None of the police claims have been independently confirmed.

There is no independent investigative unit In Saskatchewan to examine cases of police harm to civilians in the province. RCMP Chief Superintendent Maureen Levy has reported that the Regina Police Service is now investigating the circumstances surrounding the killing of Whitstone by RCMP officers.

Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Justice will also appoint what it calls an independent observer to oversee the investigation, but such observers are almost always former police officers, so in no way independent. Justice Ministry spokesman Drew Wilby explained at a news conference that in cases were an independent observer is requested, the ministry appoints someone such as a former police officer. Yet, Wilby suggested, incredulously, that, “This individual will not be connected to the RCMP.” But it could well be a fellow officer so no claims of independence have any credibility.

Saskatchewan RCMP are a directly colonial military force. It remains a force of settler colonial military occupation of Indigenous lands and has an ongoing history of violence against Indigenous people and communities.


Regina Police To Investigate RCMP In Custody Death of 46-Year-Old Woman

The Regina Police Service will conduct an investigation into the death of a 46-year-old woman at the RCMP Indian Head detachment on Saturday, September 2, 2017. The woman was in the cell area and paramedics took her to Indian Head Hospital where she was declared dead. Police are using one of the dubious designations they favor, sudden death, to describe the case. No further details have been provided publicly. There is no independent oversight body to examine cases of police harm to civilians in Saskatchewan. Police are allowed to investigate police.