Tag Archives: RCMP

Alberta RCMP Shoot and Kill Woman who Asked for Help (Sept. 23, 2019)

Strathcona County (near Edmonton, Alberta) RCMP shot and killed a woman who had called them requesting assistance. RCMP responded to the victim’s call for help at her home in the Pine Street area at about 7:30 AM. At some point a responding officer shot and killed her. She was taken to hospital where she was pronounced dead.

The Alberta Serious Investigation Response Team (ASIRT), the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in the province, is investigating the killing.


License to Kill: Killer Cop Elizabeth Cucheran Let Off by Crown for Hudson Brooks Killing

When it comes to police killings of civilians, the state protects the state. This is not surprising given that police are the force of brute violence (the state’s monopoly on violence) which always accompanies and underpins the state’s legislative (ideological) face. Law and force go hand in hand.

On July 18, 2015, RCMP Constable Elizabeth Cucheran shot 20-year-old Hudson Brooks nine times outside the RCMP detachment in South Surrey, killing him. The Constable fired a dozen times at the youth, who was shirtless and shoeless and in some mental health distress. On September 18, 2019, more than four years later, the British Columbia prosecution service announced that charges of aggravated assault and assault with a weapon had been stayed against Constable Cucheran.

That the killer cop did not even face charges of murder or manslaughter for shooting an unarmed youth nine times and that it took more than four years to reach this decision shows the special manner with which police who kill are treated by the state in Canada.

Even more, in announcing their the prosecution service chose to emphasize that “the law is clear that even the mistaken belief in the need to use lethal force is a complete defence.” Killer cops always have this excuse, no matter how unjustified, ludicrous, or unsubstantiated, at their ready disposal. It is all they ever need to kill when they want, under whatever conditions they themselves alone decide. Police define the circumstances and they define reasonableness. Even if they are mistaken or lying. Few prosecutors, who depend on police for their cases (and who also uphold the state as do police), will ever challenge them. It is literally a license to kill.

This case earlier showed as well the way in which police lie after they kill someone to suggest that the victim posed a greater threat than they did. To blame the victim. Initial RCMP statements suggested that there had been an exchange of gunfire and an officer was also shot. This gave a public impression that Brooks had been armed and there had been some sort of gunfight between the victim and officers. It was later revealed that Constable Cucheran, in a lethal panic, had shot herself among the 12 shots she fired.


Lucien Silverquill (37) Identified as Saulteaux Man Killed by RCMP at Fishing Lake First Nation

Lucien Silverquill has been identified publicly by his brother Moses Silverquill as the 37-year-old Saulteaux man shot and killed by Saskatchewan RCMP. The victim was a father with young children. The scene he describes, and the RCMP handling of it, raises some serious questions about police conduct.

Moses Silverquill suggests that the RCMP, as is often the case when they kill someone, were more concerned with an arrest than with ensuring the victim received necessary medical attention. He reports that Lucien Silverquill was shot twice, once in the chest and once in the leg. He says his brother was alive for some time but in great pain.

According to Moses Siverquill, RCMP officers attempted to handcuff and subdue his brother after they had shot him. In his view more than half an hour passed before Lucien Silverquill was put into the ambulance that had arrived on the scene (Pasiuk 2019). In his words: “It was a very horrific scene when we got there….They didn’t give him CPR or anything like that. They just pinned him to the ground. That’s what we saw” (quoted in Pasiuk 2019).

Moses Silverquill also points out the lack of information and response to questions by RCMP. He says that RCMP refused to let family members near his injured brother. According to Moses Silverquill: “It was very hard to get answers from [RCMP] as to what was going on with my brother” (quoted in Pasiuk 2019).

He has many questions about police actions before, during, and after the shooting. He wonders why alternative approaches were not taken and why police acted so quickly to shoot and were so single minded in privileging arrest over medical care, which his brother clearly needed. He asks: “I know the police officer that did the shooting must be really emotionally disturbed but was it dealt with properly? That’s the question…. Could this guy’s life have been saved?” (quoted in Pasiuk 2019).

Moses Silverquill reflects on the brother taken from his family by police violence: “My brother was a good person…. He had kids. He left little kids. I know he was a caring guy when he was with his family” (quoted in Pasiuk 2019).

 

Further Reading

Pasiuk, Emily. 2019. “Family Identifies Lucien Silverquill as Man Killed by RCMP on Fishing Lake First Nation.” CBC News August 28. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/lucien-silverquill-fishing-lake-first-nation-rcmp-shooting-1.5262506


Saskatchewan RCMP Shoot and Kill Man at Fishing Lake First Nation (Aug. 27, 2019)

Saskatchewan RCMP have shot and killed a man at a home on Fishing Lake First Nation, on the afternoon of August 27, 2019. The only report made publicly so far has been made by the RCMP. It has not been confirmed. The RCMP claim that officers from the Wadena detachment were dispatched at around 1:30 PM after receiving a call about a man, allegedly armed with a knife, causing a disturbance outside of a home. Shortly after encountering a man at least one officer discharged their firearm, striking him. The man was declared dead at the scene.

There is no police oversight body in Saskatchewan. RCMP have asked the Moose Jaw Police Service to conduct a police investigation into the killing. They have also asked the Saskatchewan Ministry of Justice to appoint an independent observer to asses the quality of the external investigation. The latter request is in accordance with the RCMP Act. This means that there will be no, even nominally, independent investigation into this killing.

The victim’s next of kin have reportedly been notified of his death but the name is not being released publicly.


Woman Falls to Death with RCMP Present in Surrey, British Columbia (Aug. 13, 2019)

The Independent Investigations Office (IIO), the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in British Columbia, is investigating after a woman fell to her death in the presence of RCMP officers on August 13, 2019 in Surrey, British Columbia.

The IIO report that RCMP responded to an apartment complex in the 14000 block of 103A Avenue regarding a woman on the edge of a ninth floor balcony. Police entered the building, and, at some point, the woman fell. She died on the scene. No other details have been released publicly.

This is the second IIO investigation of RCMP in a matter of days. Police shot a man on 135A Street in Whalley on August 14.


RCMP Shoot and Kill Kyaw Din (54) in Maple Ridge, British Columbia (Aug. 11, 2019)

British Columbia RCMP shot and killed a man who has been identified by family members as Kyaw Din (54) at a Maple Ridge home on August 11, 2019. The killing took place at a home in the area of Colemore Street and 124 Avenue.

Family members have spoken publicly to say that the victim had a history of mental illness and had been between hospital and home over a period of some time. His brother Thant Din reports that Kyaw Din had forgotten or refused to take his medication the Sunday he was killed. According to Din: “In the past, my sister would call police, and police would come and take him to hospital. So today my sister called police, but he didn’t want to go” (quoted in Boynton 2019).

Din reports that his brother had barricaded himself in his room and refused to leave when police arrived. He says that his sister asked that he and other siblings come to come to Maple Ridge from Coquitlam to help translate between their brother and police (Boynton 2019).

Din recalls the frustration of conversations with police. In his words: “My sister told police, ‘Don’t do anything, they’re 15 minutes away, they’re on their way.’ When we show up, there’s police tape and we can’t go inside” (quoted in Boynton 2019).

He expresses his horror over police actions toward his brother: “They shot him. They shot him point blank. They unnecessarily killed someone” (quoted in Boynton 2019).

Kyaw Din’s sister Yin Yin reports that she was told by police to wait outside the home. She then heard three shots. Incredibly, three officers came outside of the home “about an hour later,” but left the scene before she could talk with them (Boynton 2019).

She reports publicly her conversation with police: “They asked me if my brother has a gun. He doesn’t have a gun. He doesn’t have a knife. He’s just in the room and I told the police he has a glass bottle that he might throw at you. I don’t want you to get hurt and I don’t want the police to shoot my brother” (quoted in Holliday 2019).

She insists that police deceived her and the family: “They lied to me. They promised me, ‘we would never shoot your brother, we deal with this all the time,’ and they shot him” (quoted in Boynton 2019).

She is left only to ponder, in sorrow: “For no reason, they shot him. Can you imagine? Brother was doing housework in the morning and now he is dead” (quoted in Holliday 2019)

Thant Din Thant tells reporters that his brother was sometimes loud and confrontational when not taking his medicine, but he never saw Kyaw Din become violent. According to Thant Din: “He never hit anybody. He might be screaming and yelling, but he never hit anybody” (quoted in Holliday 2019).

Thant Din is angry and wants to see police held accountable for what happened. As he puts it, poignantly: “We’re heartbroken. To have a mentally ill person shot in his own home? It’s terrible” (quoted in Boynton 2019).

It has been reported by the Independent Investigations Office (IIO), the unit that examines cases of police harm to civilians in the province, that police officers also used a taser on the victim.

Police across Canada kill numerous people experiencing mental health issues every. Cops should not be responding to people in mental health crisis and resources should be moved from police to mental health and health care supports and resources.

Further Reading
Boynton, Sean. 2019. “Police Watchdog Investigating Fatal Officer-Involved Shooting in Maple Ridge.” Global News August 11. https://globalnews.ca/news/5753550/maple-ridge-officer-involved-shooting/

Holliday, Ian. 2019. “IIO Investigating after Police Shoot Mentally Ill Man in Maple Ridge.” CTV News August 11. https://bc.ctvnews.ca/iio-investigating-after-police-shoot-mentally-ill-man-in-maple-ridge-1.4545247


RCMP Shoot and Kill Man in Truro, Nova Scotia (August 10, 2019)

An RCMP officer shot and killed a man in Truro, Nova Scotia, near Halifax, in the early morning of August 10, 2019. The Serious Incident Response Team (SIRT), the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in the province, is investigating. Police reports, that have not been independently confirmed, claim that the fatal event started when an officer spotted a car that had been reported stolen in Cumberland County at around 2:30 AM. Police claim that the vehicle hit the officer, and the officer shot at the driver. The driver was struck by police fire and died at the scene. There are no identified witnesses at this point, but a bystander claims to have heard on a police scanner that the event began with a police chase.