Tag Archives: shooting

Fifteen-Year-Old Shot by Peel Regional Police Dies

A 15-year-old boy who was shot by Peel Regional Police in Mississauga, Ontario on July 27, 2017, has died of his injuries. The death of the boy, who has not been named publicly as of this publication date, was announced on August 26. Following the shooting by police he had been taken to SickKids Hospital in Toronto. Initial reports claimed that police had been called about a robbery in the area of Creditview and Britannia roads involving three young men.

The Special Investigations Unit (SIU), the unit that examines police harm to civilians in Ontario has said that two of the youth fled while the youth who would be killed stayed in the area where he may have attempted other robberies (a video has appeared which CBC Toronto claims shows the youth brandishing a weapon, real or replica, at a Pizza Pizza worker). He was shot by police around 2 AM outside in a commercial plaza. The SIU has assigned six investigators and two forensic investigators to the case.

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Toronto Constables Jeffery Riel and Darryl Lambie Identified as Officers in Killing of Kwasi Skene-Peters

A court case has revealed the names of two officers in the killing of Kwasi Skene-Peters (21) in 2015 to be Constable Jeffery Riel and Constable Darryl Lambie. The names of the officers who shot at Skene-Peters were released as part of a court case involving Kevin Duro (26), who was a passenger in the car at the time of the police killing. The officers were members of the controversial and now-disbanded Toronto Anti-Violence Intervention Strategy (TAVIS) team.

The names of police officers involved in killing civilians in Canada are rarely made public, typically only being revealed in coroners’ inquests, lawsuits by family members,  or court cases. Killer cops are rarely charged for their actions in the Canadian context.

The Special Investigations Unit (SIU) which examines cases of police harm to civilians but does not release the names of killer cops publicly has already exonerated the officers who killed Skene-Peters. They have not confirmed that the officers named in the Duro court case are the subject officers in the Skene-Peters killing, but the court case identifies them as the two who fired shots during that event.

Neither subject officer spoke with the SIU or provided a copy of their notes during the investigation, a limitation of such investigations. However, they had no problem giving their accounts of the shooting in order to secure Kevin Duro’s conviction on firearms charges.


Repeat Killer Cop, Other Officers Cleared in Killing David McQueen, Quadriplegic in Wheelchair

The Alberta Serious Incident Response Team (ASIRT), the unit that investigates police harm to civilians, has cleared the repeat killer cop and the other Calgary police officers who shot and killed David McQueen, a 53-year-old quadriplegic man in a wheelchair, on January 24, 2016. ASIRT reported that several officers opened fire on McQueen with the last round fired , a bullet from a sniper, striking him in the head and killing him, but said the officers involved were fully justified in the killing. Police had reportedly responded to reports of McQueen firing a round from inside his house. Police fired tear gas into McQueen’s house driving him outside where they shot and killed him.

The killing of McQueen, quadriplegic with limited use of hands, in a wheelchair in his home, experiencing some mental distress has raised many disturbing questions. One of these relates to the fact that a officer who shot at McQueen was a killer cop who had committed a fatal shooting only a year before. That officer shot 27-year-old Anthony Heffernan four times, with three shots to the head and neck, on March 16, 2015. Heffernan had also been in some distress but was alone and confined to his hotel room and posed no threat to anyone, police or public, when police broke into his room and shot and killed him there.

The ASIRT investigation into Heffernan’s killing actually found evidence that an offense had been committed by police. The Crown claimed that there was not enough evidence to gain a conviction against the officer and did not pursue charges. The state certainly protects the state. The Heffernan family is suing Calgary police over the killing of their loved one.

In the ASIRT release on the McQueen killing, Susan Hughson, executive director of ASIRT, suggested that the killer cop’s involvement in the Heffernan case has no bearing on his right to use his firearm in another case. According to Hughson:

 

“You have to look at the incidents independently and look at the circumstances surrounding them to determine whether the steps taken or the actions taken were justified. And, just because the officer has been involved in another officer-involved shooting, he does not lose the protection of the law.”

 

Protection to kill civilians? Others might ask why the officer was still on the force and being deployed in such situations of a person in distress.

Director Hughson, noted McQueen’s distress: “There’s no doubt that this man was in crisis on this date.” Hughson noted that McQueen had been “struggling physically, emotionally and financially” in the days prior to his being killed by police. He has been particularly upset by the death of his beloved dog only the week before. Disturbingly ASIRT appeared to use this fact to make reference to a bogus “suicide by cop” defense for the police killing of David McQueen.

 


Surete du Quebec Shoot and Kill 23-Year-Old Man in La Sarre (Aug. 20, 2017)

The Independent Investigations Bureau (BEI), the unit that examines police harm to civilians in Quebec, is investigating the killing of a 23-year-old man by Surete du Quebec officers in La Sarre, a town in northwestern Quebec on August 20, 2017.

According to the BEI, two Surete du Quebec officers in vehicle patrol attempted to intercept a vehicle around 6 PM.  A police pursuit ended with the two vehicles colliding. Following the collision the victim excited his vehicle and was quickly shot by police. He died as a result of those police-inflicted wounds. Police have reported the man held a knife but none of the police accounts have been independently confirmed.

The BEI has assigned eight investigators to the case. The BEI is not an independent unit and will be assisted by a forensic identification technician and a reconstructionist from the Montreal police.


SIU Denies Justice for Tony Divers: Killer Hamilton Cop Cleared Despite Serious Questions

Family and loved ones of Tony Divers have been kept in the dark about the SIU investigation into the police killing of the 36-year-old Hamilton man. On Thursday, August 10, 2017, they received the awful news that the Special Investigations Unit  has cleared the Hamilton officer who shot Tony Divers will not be charged. The decision comes 10 months after the killing on September 30, 2017, a too long period of time in which questions from the family have not been properly addressed.

The officer responsible fired two shots at the unarmed Divers, with one bullet hitting the victim in the chest. Despite the fact that Divers was unarmed, SIU Director Tony Loparco concluded the officer was justified in believing his own life was at risk and in fearing that Divers was armed. Under Loparco the already questionable SIU has become something of a legitimation mechanism for cops who kill civilians.

Yvonne Alexander, Tony Divers’ sister, and a tireless advocate for information and justice, responded with the pained honesty of someone whose loved one has been killed by police: “I’m shocked but I’m not at all surprised. Because it seems to be the norm these days for officers to shoot and kill someone in mental crisis” (quoted in Bennett 2017).

Of particular concern for observers is the report that the call to police included a claim that Divers was  “anti-police.” Did this play into the quick resort to lethal force by Hamilton police?

This is reinforced by Loparco’s  conclusion in the case: “On all of the information that the [officer] had in his possession at the time he shot and killed Mr. Divers, I find that the [officer], subjectively, had reasonable grounds to believe that his life was at risk from Mr. Divers” (quoted in Bennett 2017). Because he was said to be “anti-police?”

Loparco continues: “I find in all the circumstances, that despite the after the fact knowledge that Mr. Divers was not armed, the [officer] reasonably believed that his life was in danger from Mr. Divers and his actions in firing upon Mr. Divers were justified” (quoted in Bennett 2017). This is in keeping with other SIU findings under Loparco.

Loparco further notes in his report that the officer who shot Tony Divers had had previous contact with the victim and considered him “anti-police and very violent” (quoted in Bennett 2017). The officer actually appears to have held several prejudices against Tony Divers, including the assumptions that he was involved in organized crime and a drug user. The SIU report does not delve into these issues in probing detail.

The family says that Tony Divers was struggling with mental health issues when the officer shot him. For the family, this did not matter to police who responded to their loved one through the prejudging lens that held him as simply a thug.

Edward Divers, the victim’s brother, said the decision and explanation for why the shooting is justified felt to him like “an eye for an eye,” that his brother was treated as a “violent thug” with no regard for his mental illness.

One eyewitness, who says he did not see Divers holding any weapon, also said the victim appeared to pose no threat to anyone. Yet he did note that Divers did not seem subservient to the officer, a situation that seems to provoke police violence (respect their authority or die). According to witness Joe Towers: “He didn’t look very afraid of the cop; he wasn’t being cooperative, but he didn’t look like he was any particular threat. It just didn’t seem like he wanted to be arrested” (quoted in Bennett 2017).

Further Reading

Bennett, Kelly. 2017. “SIU Clears Hamilton Officer in Death of Man Shot Near GO Station.” CBC News August 10. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/divers-siu-decision-released-1.4204146

 


58-Year-Old Man Shot Multiple Times and Killed by Montreal Police (June 27, 2017)

Montreal police shot and killed a 58-year-old man in the mid-evening of June 27, 2017 outside his home. The man was shot multiple times by police at about 7:19 PM after they were apparently called out because the victim was said to be committing the high crime of destroying things in his own apartment near the corner of Robillard and St-André streets. Police claim they used a taser and rubber bullets on the man before deciding they needed to kill him.

City ambulance services have reported that the victim was in cardiac arrest when he was transported to hospital. The BEI (Bureau des enquêtes indépendantes, Bureau of Independent Investigations), the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in Quebec, is investigating.


Inquest Called Into Quebec Police Killing of 17-Year-Old Brandon Maurice

Brandon Maurice was shot and killed by a Sûreté du Québec officer on November 16, 2015 in Messine (near Maniwaki) following a vehicular pursuit. On May 19, 2017, the province’s chief coroner,  Catherine Rudel-Tessier, ordered an inquest into the teenager’s killing by police. The inquest will be overseen by deputy chief coroner Luc Malouin. It cannot assign blame but can only make recommendations to address future such incidents. These are typically ignored or not implemented by police agencies under review.

Montreal police investigated their provincial colleagues, completing their examination in June 2016. Quite predictably they found for their colleague and concluded that no charges would be brought against their fellow officer. Yet the officer had fired wildly in the general direction of the driver, said to have been Maurice, and only luckily avoided hitting a passenger in the vehicle.

Maurice’s family was not satisfied with that investigation and found it illegitimate for police to be investigating police. In the words of Brandon Maurice’s mother, Dominique Bernier in 2016: “Police officers protect each other.” Indeed they do. The family’s view, quite reasonable, is that  investigations cannot be impartial when police investigate their colleagues. The family believes the officer used force that was excessive for a stopped car starting to drive away from an officer.