Tag Archives: Toronto

Police Kill Man Inside Bank North of Toronto (Dec. 13, 2017)

Details are still emerging after police killed a man in an RBC Bank in a commercial plaza in Maple, Ontario, north of Toronto. Initial media reports suggest the man was armed and there may have been a standoff and hostage situation. These reports have not been independently confirmed by sources beyond police at this point.

Police attended the scene in response to a call at about 1 PM. It is reported that they arrived at the RBC branch to find a gunman as well as a number of other people inside, including staff and clients. A negotiating team was brought in but it is not clear if they negotiated with the victim before killing him. At the time of writing the bank is still being cleared and there are no confirmed details on how many people were in the bank at the time or the reason the victim was in the bank.

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Killer Toronto Cop James Forcillo Heading to Prison as Bail Revoked

Killer Toronto cop James Forcillo is going to prison after his bail was revoked it was announced on November 30, 2017. Forcillo shot and killed 18-year-old Sammy Yatim on July 27, 2013, shooting the teenager multiple times, including after he had fallen to the ground from a fatal shot, even though Yatim was alone on an empty streetcar and posed no immediate threat to the public or to police. The killing was captured on video. Constable Forcillo was convicted in 2016 of attempted murder in the killing, because he shot Yatim after he had fallen to the ground of wounds already inflicted by the officer. He was sentenced to six years in prison.

Forcillo had been out on bail pending the appeal of his conviction. He was arrested earlier in November 2017 for allegedly failing to comply with the bail conditions by failing to live with his surety or to inform authorities of a change of address, according to police. Forcillo has been in custody for two weeks since his arrest.

Following his arrest, the Attorney General of Ontario applied to have Forcillo’s bail revoked. A judge granted that request this week. Forcillo will remain in police custody while a charge of breaching bail is dealt with in court. That court date is set for December 15, 2017. He will then be transferred to federal prison to begin serving his prison sentence.


SIU Investigating Death of 57-Year-Old Man in Toronto Police Custody

The Special Investigations Unit (SIU), the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in Ontario, is investigating the death of a 57-year-old man in custody of Toronto police on the evening of Sunday, November 26, 2017. According to the SIU, the man, who has not yet been named publicly, was sitting handcuffed in an apartment building security office when Toronto police officers arrived in response to a disturbance call. The SIU reports that after the officers searched the man he was returned to a sitting position. A short time later, the man fell over and his vital signs were absent. He was pronounced dead in hospital early on the morning of Monday, November 27. No other details have been released publicly, including information regarding why the man was arrested in the first place, or what the so-called disturbance involved.


Killer Toronto Cop James Forcillo Charged With Breaching Bail Conditions

Killer Toronto cop James Forcillo, who shot and killed teenager Sammy Yatim, who was alone on an empty streetcar, in 2013 and was later convicted of attempted murder in that case, was charged on Wednesday, November 15, 2017, for breaching his bail conditions. The Special Investigations Unit, the agency that examines cases of police harm to civilians in Ontario, has reported that Constable Forcillo, who has been out on bail while he appeals his conviction, was accused of breaching conditions related to his house arrest, but they have provided no additional details about the case.

Forcillo’s force, the Toronto police, have reported that Forcillo was charged with failing to comply with recognizance.  Forcillo was allegedly found at a new residence address in violation of his bail conditions. Constable Forcillo was arrested by Toronto police at around 7:30 AM and made a brief court appearance shortly after 11 AM before being remanded into custody. According to Forcillo’s lawyer, Peter Brauti, a bail hearing on this new charge has been put over to Friday, November 17.

Forcillo had his bail conditions extended in late September of 2017, only one day before he was set to appeal his 2016 conviction in the killing of Sammy Yatim. Forcillo, who shot Yatim multiple times, even after the youth had fallen to the ground from a fatal shot, was sentenced to six years in prison, one year more than the mandatory minimum.

The judge in Forcillo’s trial referred to video of the killing as “powerful evidence” that what the officer claimed occurred during the encounter did not actually occur. Ontario Superior Court Justice Edward found that Forcillo had abused his authority in a manner that served to undermine public trust in law enforcement and the justice system.

In despicable fashion, Constable Forcillo has sought an appeal in his case on the basis of the dubious claim that Yatim was attempting to commit “suicide by cop.” This is a nonsensical ruse used by killer cops to justify cases where they actively decide to kill someone, even if the victim they choose to kill is alone on a street car, away from anyone else, and posing not immediate threat to officers of the public. It is a pure piece of copaganda that serves to exonerate killer cops while blaming their victims. Of course, cops can choose not to shoot to kill. They decide, not the victim, which marks this as very distinct from suicide.

Ed Upenieks, a lawyer for the Yatim family, noted that the alleged breach of conditions by Forcillo shows the officer has a lack of respect for the system. According to Upenieks: “It calls into question his respect for the legal system and for the bail conditions” (quoted in Freeman 2017).

 

Further Reading

Freeman, Joshua. 2017. “Cop in Sammy Yatim Case Arrested After Allegedly Being Found at New Home.” CP24.com November 15. http://www.cp24.com/news/cop-convicted-in-sammy-yatim-case-arrested-after-allegedly-being-found-at-new-home-1.3679007


New Trial Ordered for Killer Cop Remo Romano in Natasha Abogado Killing

Detective-Constable Remo Romano, a York police officer, will be headed to trial for a third time on charges of dangerous driving causing death for the killing of 18-year-old pedestrian Natasha Carla Abogado in February 2014. Romano (45) was on duty and behind the wheel of an undercover police pickup truck when he struck Natasha Abogado as she attempted to cross St. Clair Avenue East around 8 PM.

Romano was traveling at a speed of least 109 kilometers per hour in a 60-km/hr zone. He was reportedly trying to catch up to other members of his surveillance team, not I active pursuit of anyone.

Romano was tried in May 2016, but a jury was did not come to a unanimous verdict after a few days of deliberating, resulting in a mistrial. Romano was tried again in September 2016 and a jury acquitted him of dangerous driving causing death. Following that decision, the Crown prosecutor filed an appeal, citing issues with the way in which the judge directed the jury to come to its verdict (Beattie 2017).

On September 28, 2017, a panel of three court of appeal judges agreed with the Crown and ordered a new trial. They found that the trial judge, Justice Brian O’Marra, did wrongly explain the dangerous driving law to the jury. Specifically, the judge incorrectly instructed the jurors not only to focus on how Romano’s actions as a driver caused Abogado’s death, but also how the victim Abogado herself might have been at fault (Beattie 2017). Another case of victim blaming to excuse or justify a police killing of a civilian.

Justice David Paciocco said in his decision: “Most significantly, the trial judge made irrelevant and adverse comments about Ms. Abogado’s conduct” (quoted in Beattie 2017).

Incredibly, according to Paciocco, O’Marra instructed the jury to consider that Abogado was jaywalking and described that as an “inherently risky activity” (despite the fact that people do it all the time without harm) and that “pedestrians must be aware, when they jaywalk, that drivers are not always paying attention, not always concentrating on what is going on ahead of them” (quoted in Beattie 2017). Even more O’Marra took a page out of the “what was she wearing” playbook for dismissing women victims of crime, and argued that Abogado’s clothing was dark and had “poor visibility” at the time of the collision (Beattie 2017). This was simply a replay, and reinforcement, of the Romano legal team’s defense ploy to get their client off.

The appeals decision noted that these statements turned the jury’s attention away from the central issue of whether or not Romano’s driving was itself, in fact, dangerous (Beattie 2017). By then the damage had been done to the Crown’s case. Concluded Paciocco: “The errors in the charge … are sufficiently serious that the jury was not in a position to evaluate properly the dangerousness of the operation of the motor vehicle, leading to a miscarriage of justice” (quoted in Beattie 2017).

At the second trial, Crown prosecutor Philip Perlmutter pointed out that Romano operated his vehicle at such a high rate of speed that it became impossible for him to adjust his driving in the event that something unexpected happened (Beattie 2017). Even more, his speeding was entirely unnecessary and unjustifiable according to the Crown. The surveillance operation that Romano was part of was only focused on intelligence-gathering and, as such, was neither dangerous nor urgent (Beattie 2017). It should never have resulted in the death of an innocent young woman.

York Regional police have confirmed that Detective-Constable Remo Romano is still an active officer on the force.

 

Further Reading

Beattie, Samantha. 2017. “Third Trial Ordered for York Cop Previously Acquitted of Dangerous Driving Causing Death.” Toronto Star. November 3. https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2017/11/03/new-trial-ordered-for-york-cop-previously-acquitted-of-dangerous-driving-causing-death.html

 


Killer Toronto Cop James Forcillo’s Appeal Begins: Seeks Bogus Suicide-By-Cop Excuse

On Monday, October 2, 2017, killer Toronto Police Constable James Forcillo began the appeal of his conviction in the shooting and killing of 18-year-old Sammy Yatim on July 27, 2013.  Forcillo’s lawyers asking the Ontario Court of Appeal to reconsider an interpretation of the killing and the timing of shots fired by Forcillo.

In 2016, a jury acquitted Forcillo of second-degree murder but convicted him of attempted murder after he shot and killed the distraught Yatim, who was isolated and alone on a Toronto streetcar. Forcillo shot the stricken youth after he had fallen down from the first shots, leading to the attempted murder charge and conviction (since Yatim was incapacitated when he was shot what other motive was there to keep shooing?). Forcillo was sentenced to six years in prison but remains free on bail until possibly 2018 pending the outcome of his appeal.

Forcillo’s lawyers disagree with instructions from Justice Edward that allowed the jury to consider the killer cop’s first three shots as a separate event from his next six shots. They occurred five-and-a-half seconds apart, the second volley coming after Yatim had already fallen from a fatal shot to the chest.

Even more disturbing Forcillo’s lawyers are also appealing the conviction on the grounds that they were denied the opportunity  to frame Yatim’s killing as an attempted suicide. This ploy seeks to make use of the dubious and despicable “suicide by cop” excuse used often by police officers, forces, and police associations to justify and legitimize police killings of civilians. It has interested copagandist “criminologists” (typically current or former cops) ready and willing to promote the excuse in court on behalf of (fellow) officers. The lawyers argue that because Yatim wanted to die, less lethal interventions from Forcillo would not have worked. Forcillo lawyer Joseph Wilkinson argued at the Monday hearing that the trial judge should have allowed the evidence to “counterbalance” the Crown’s view that Sammy Yatim was a “person in crisis” who Forcillo could have dealt with without deploying  lethal force. This excuse always  seeks to remove the conscious decision of officers  to shoot someone even in cases, like that of Sammy Yatim, the victim is alone and isolated and poses no direct or immediate threat to the public or officers. The officer has the opportunity to decide and still chooses to shoot to kill. That is not suicide by any definition.

The case is being heard by a three judge panel consisting of Chief Justice George Strathy, Justice David Doherty, and Justice Gary Trotter.


Killer Toronto Cop James Forcillo Has Bail Extended to 2018

Toronto police constable James Forcillo shot and killed Sammy Yatim in 2013. Forcillo shot Yatim multiple times, firing even after the stricken youth had fallen dead. At the time Forcillo shot Sammy Yatim, the distressed youth was isolated and completely alone on a Toronto streetcar posing no threat to police or the public (as captured on witness video of the killing). For this Forcillo was sentenced in 2016 to six years behind bars, for attempting to kill Yatim (but curiously not for murder). That sentence was a rarity for killer cops in Canada, who are rarely charged and almost never convicted as the state protects the state in such cases.

Forcillo has been out on bail as he appeals the verdict and sentence. On Friday, September 29, 2017, Forcillo was granted a bail extension. A bail extension document states that the appeal process will contain a “fresh evidence phase.” The previous bail conditions for Forcillo were set to expire on Sunday, October 1, 2017, one day before the killer cops is scheduled to appeal his conviction for attempted murder in killing Sammy Yatim. Forcillo will now remain free either until the day before that hearing or until April 2, 2018 (whichever comes first).

Killer cop Forcillo is asking the appeal court to substitute a not-guilty verdict or to  order a new trial in his case. Forcillo, a member of an institution that favors and promotes mandatory minimum sentences, is also seeking a declaration that the mandatory minimum sentence for attempted murder is unconstitutional (erstwhile proponents always want mandatory sentences dropped when they come close to home). Instead Forcillo wants to be granted a suspended sentence. Otherwise he seeks a reduction of his sentence to the minimum five years.

Incredibly, Forcillo’s appeal wishes to have arguments presented arguing for the bogus and discredited “suicide by cop” justification for police killings. This is a piece of propaganda, or copaganda, used to  excuse or legitimize police killings of civilians. It is a mechanism for blaming the victim and removing a killer cop’s responsibility in deciding to shoot and kill someone who may have been in distress, even where they posed no threat to the public or to officers (as in a youth alone in an empty streetcar). It is despicable and nasty ploy by police and their supporters. Unfortunately there are unprincipled “criminologists” for hire (usually active or former cops) who are willing to promote this copaganda in courts to defend killer cops.